This weeks links are all about politics and the web. It is fascinating to see how the latest developments of social media and community driven websites slowly hit arena or bypass the government as Jonathan Freedland from the Guardian says.

  • The internet will revolutionise the very meaning of politics Comment by Jonathan Freedland from the guardian: “Technology could make the bypassing of traditional government institutions look very appealing. Witness the rapid action of MoveOn.org, which put together 30,000 evacuees from Hurricane Katrina and 10,000 volunteers ready to give them a bed. Or check out Kiva.org, which matches people with cash in the rich world to entrepreneurs in developing countries who need a loan. What these groups illustrate is not only a frustration with traditional government, but a way the internet can bypass government altogether.” Concerning development and the example of Kiva, I recently wrote a post about that topic.
  • The Blogging Revolution: Government in the Age of Web 2.0 Government2.0 is on the rise and one part about it will be blogging. An interesting study by David C. Wyld on blogging in general and how it can be implemented by governments.
  • Politics 2.0: Fight Different “Open-source politics is the idea that social networking and participatory technologies will revolutionize our ability to follow, support, and influence political campaigns.”